What are the 3 main themes in Romeo and Juliet?

What are the 3 main themes in Romeo and Juliet?

ThemesThe Forcefulness of Love. Romeo and Juliet is the most famous love story in the English literary tradition. Love as a Cause of Violence. The themes of death and violence permeate Romeo and Juliet, and they are always connected to passion, whether that passion is love or hate. The Individual Versus Society.

Is death a theme in Romeo and Juliet?

Death is a theme that lurks throughout the play. In many ways, Romeo and Juliet shows the journey of the two lovers from their initial, love-filled meeting up to their death. Thus, death serves as the tragic resolution of various conflicts.

How does Romeo view death?

Romeo says death has “no power yet upon Iluliet’s beauty” (line 93). Even when Romeo believes Juliet is dead, he believes her beauty is more powerful than death. Later, Romeo describes death as “unsubstantial death” (line 103) in reference to Juliet. This supports his belief that death cannot conquer Juliet’s beauty.

Who was the last to see Juliet alive?

Friar Laurence

What is the ending to Romeo and Juliet?

At the end of Romeo and Juliet, Romeo returns to Verona because he believes Juliet is dead. When he arrives at her tomb she appears lifeless, and in his grief he kills himself by drinking poison. Moments later Juliet wakes, and, finding Romeo dead, she plunges his sword into her breast.

Why does Romeo figure Juliet is still so beautiful?

He doesn’t realize that the “death” is just a potion that’s wearing off. Instead, why does he figure Juliet is still so beautiful? She wants to get some of the poison off his lips and onto hers to kill her as well. Juliet says, “Thy lips are warm!” This is,quite arguably, one of the saddest lines in the entire play.

What does Juliet do after kissing Romeo?

Juliet sees Romeo dead beside her, and surmises from the empty vial that he has drunk poison. Hoping she might die by the same poison, Juliet kisses his lips, but to no avail. Hearing the approaching watch, Juliet unsheathes Romeo’s dagger and, saying, “O happy dagger, / This is thy sheath,” stabs herself (5.3. 171).

Do you bite your thumb at us sir?

ABRAM: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? SAMPSON: (aside to GREGORY) Is the law of our side if I say “ay”? GREGORY: (aside to SAMPSON) No. Abram understands the symbolic meaning behind Sampson’s biting his thumb and takes offense at the gesture.